Resolve More Claims

While it’s a misconception that every time something is damaged or missing it’s always the carrier’s fault, they certainly should accept their fair share and often don’t simply because there was no clear path of responsibility in tracking where the damage or shortage occurred.  Other variables such as vendor packaging, loading a carrier improperly, or goods being damaged after delivery can make it difficult to pinpoint liability.  The result, you’re left holding the baggage on a denied claim. 

 

Fortunately there are 3 simple steps you can take that will immediately decrease the number of freight claim denials you see.  Resolving more claims means recovering more dollars! 

Adhering to these simple steps on the jobsite will eliminate three common grounds of carrier denial and you’ll see more claims resolved in your favor: 

1)      Receive Properly:  Count and inspect all goods at the time of delivery.  Make sure all visible damage or shortages are notated on the carrier’s bill of lading at the time of delivery.  Carrier negligence is almost always evident when there has been visible damage to the goods packaging exterior or to the product itself in more severe instances.  Example of cartons crushed, torn and visible product damage at the time of delivery almost always hold the carrier liable as long as it is noted on the carriers delivery receipt. 

2)      Report Promptly:  Carriers should be notified as quickly as possible of intent to file claim.  If the product was received short or damaged, and notations made on the bill of lading, most carriers will accept freight claims up to 9 months from the date of delivery.  Concealed damage (no notations made at time of delivery), requires much faster notification.  Industry standard is days from time of delivery.  If claims are not filed within these time parameters, the carrier will have grounds to deny the claim.

3)      Retain Product & Packaging:  Do not discard product or packaging until the claim has been fully resolved.  Carriers have the right to inspect the product and mitigate claims where possible, and salvage goods to offset losses when claim is fully awarded.  Moving goods within a facility or disposing of packaging without inspection may result in a denial of claim.  


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